The 17 Essential Seville Restaurants

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A high-ceilinged bar with rows of bottles.
Interior of El Rinconcillo
El Rinconcillo

Regional tapas from a flamenco-singing chef, hyperseasonal scoops from an artisan ice cream wizard, and more great bites to try now in Seville

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Interior of El Rinconcillo
| El Rinconcillo

With more than 300 days of sunshine a year, Seville has developed a reputation in Spain for its buzzing social scene. On any given Tuesday, you’ll find tons of callejeros, literally “street people,” out and about, sipping ice-cold beers, throwing back modestly priced tapas, and carrying on until the wee hours of the morning. To cater to all these thirsty and hungry revelers, Seville offers more bars and restaurants than any reasonable person could ever experience in one visit.

As the capital of the southern Andalusia region, Seville has acted for centuries as a crossroads for peoples from Europe, North Africa, and Asia. Moorish rule during the Middle Ages had a particularly outsized influence on the city’s architecture and culture. These influences are clear today around town and at Seville’s historic, centuries-old establishments, distinguishing the city from Spain’s other culinary capitals.

Megan Frances Lloyd is a freelance food and travel journalist living in Seville, Spain. You can find her bylines in places like Conde Nast Traveler, Bon Appétit, United Hemispheres, and Fodor’s Essential Spain.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

In an 18th-century carriage house, the folks at La Cochera del Abuelo have created an intimate dining experience that feels equally elegant and homey. Owner Cinta Romero’s experience is evident in the thorough service from her front-of-house team, along with the succinct list of especially engaging wines. The menu here changes regularly, but chef Bosco Benítez has a particular affinity for vegetables and the grill, which imparts whispers of smoke to even the lightest of dishes. The one-bite appetizers are some of the most memorable items, like a shell-on carpaccio-style scallop with smoky eggplant.

From above, a decorative plate with slices of squid on top of vegetables and pesto.
Squid with portobello carpaccio and pesto.
La Cochera del Abuelo

Unless you befriend a local, this is as close as you’ll come to eating in a Spanish home. Owner Ramón López initially opened his shop as an abacería (a wine store offering packaged foods and a few quick bites), but he and his family have since expanded to serve a full menu of breakfast, lunch, and dinner. The restaurant’s cozy ambience and the family’s dedication to quality sourcing have made Antigua Abacería an icon in the San Lorenzo neighborhood. Order a montadito de chorizo picante y cabrales (a sandwich with spicy chorizo and Asturian blue cheese) with a glass of sherry, and take your meal outside onto the quiet patio. Or step inside the cozy corner restaurant for “Lo que diga Ramón” and let López choose your meal for you.

Hidden behind the Basílica de Jesús del Gran Poder, Eslava serves elevated Andalusian tapas and seems to be perpetually full of tourists and locals. The restaurant has rightfully won awards for many of its offerings, including the huevo sobre bizcocho de boletus y trufa (egg yolk over a truffle mushroom cake), but the honey rosemary pork ribs also deserve your utmost attention.

An egg yolk sits on a gravy covered cake.
Egg yolk over truffle mushroom cake at Eslava.
Eslava

Esteban Mujica has lived many lives. Born in Venezuela and raised in the United States, he embarked on careers in cycling, journalism, and wine. Most recently he resurrected his grandfather’s six vermouth recipes and built a bar where he could serve them alongside family stories. Mujica makes each vermouth from scratch, utilizing the region’s sherry wines and up to 54 different herbs. Trust him with your culinary preferences and he’ll pour you a refreshing vermouth or rare local wine to your taste, then carefully whip up a tapa to make your palate sing. Some of his finest dishes include trifásico de ahumados (a trio of mystery smoked fish Mujica likes to challenge diners to identify) and marinated sardines with manchego butter and mango pearls.

Spanish wines are regularly overlooked for popular Riojas and albariños, even down south. But owner Ana Linares Martínez is breaking the mold of many Sevillano wine shops at Lama La Uva by sourcing interesting bottles from small producers, with a particular affinity for Andalusia. This is where you can get your natural wines and funky ancestrals. If you’re lucky, you’ll still find a few trace bottles of Lama La Uva’s own blends, which Linares describes with great affinity as “extremely nerdy.” Tastings are available, but you can also pick a bottle straight off the shelf and pair it immediately with the shop’s robust charcuterie board, which is always on point, before moving onto the recently debuted tapas menu.

The interior of a wine shop with bottles lining simple wood shelves, with diners visible at tables outside beyond the front door.
Shopping at Lama La Uva.
Lama La Uva

Pedro Sierra opened Seville’s first micro-roaster in 2015 in the shadow of the Setas, setting up his coffee roaster in the back of his to-go-only craft coffee shop. He eventually moved the roaster off-site, but his workspace doesn’t look any less cramped, and visiting isn’t always easy. There are just a few stools outside for seating, and Sierra only opens the shop six to seven hours each day (so he can drop off and pick up his kids from school). But it’s worth the hassle to try the coffee maestro’s next-to-perfect flat whites.

A proprietor stands in the doorway of a coffee shop.
Virgin Coffee in Seville.
Cristina Jiménez Sánchez

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Known as the oldest tapas bar in Seville, El Rinconcillo opened its doors in 1670 just two blocks southeast of the Palacio de las Dueñas. The decor is quintessentially Sevillano: colorful Arabic tiles, dark wooden barrels, and a curtain of cured Iberian hams hanging over the bar. Though the crowds of tourists and locals may persuade you to ask for a quiet table upstairs, it’s best to embrace the chaos and huddle around the bar area to eat standing up in the traditional tapas style. Order the espinacas con garbanzos (braised spinach and garbanzos), and watch the servers tally your order directly on the mahogany bar, which acts as a chalkboard.

A server passes a plate of spinach across a bar.
Spinach with chickpeas at El Rinconcillo
El Rinconcillo

Seville’s sweltering summer seems to defy set calendar dates, making ice cream the surefire dessert of choice for a good stretch of the year. And no one does it better than the local ice cream wizard who runs Créeme and goes by the mononym Chami. His artisan shop, shaded under the impressive ficus varietals in the Plaza del Museo, serves hyperseasonal scoops that change constantly. Each flavor, whether it’s a classic pistachio or brilliant orange flecked with dark chocolate, is made with meticulously sourced ingredients, and all are poetically inspired by an event, person, or idea in the ice cream maker’s past and present. The solid selection of dairy-free options are just as worthy of praise.

A hand holds two ice cream cones, one a bright yellow, the other a rich chocolate.
Ice cream is always in season.
Créeme

This modest cafe, just a short walk from the Plaza del Duque, opens for morning churros from 7:30 a.m. until noon, then shuts down for the afternoon. When the owners turn the fryer on again at 5 p.m., crowds flood in, bartenders rapidly throw down steaming cups of hot coffee and thick hot chocolate, and servers fly out of the kitchen with fresh churros (to the amusement of anyone watching from the bar). The restaurant offers two styles: traditional airy churros and denser corrugated ones made with pureed potato. Try them both and decide for yourself which is better.

Sevillanos often use the word castizo to describe a traditional tapas bar, and this place lives up to the name, serving typical regional dishes with high-quality ingredients. The contemporary open kitchen makes for a lively atmosphere, especially given chef Francisco Balongo’s penchant for singing flamenco. You can’t go wrong with the well-rounded list of wines and superb Sevillano dishes like atún encebollado (stewed tuna) and shrimp croquettes. Be sure to ask your server about the ultra-fresh, daily offerings hiding at the seafood bar.

From above, a dish of fish in tomato sauce.
Fried Hake with Tomato Salad at Castizo.
Castizo

Antonio Romero has a few locations around town, but the spot on Harinas street in the Arenal neighborhood boasts the restaurant’s best Andalusian fare and Sevillano vibe. The place is known for its classic montadito de pringá (a toasted roll filled with all kinds of braised pork), but don’t miss the artichokes with cured Iberian ham or the carrillada (wine-braised pork cheeks).

A thin meaty sandwich on a plate resting on a bartop.
Montadito de Pringá.
Jenna Swan

Since 1850, many generations of the Morales family have worked at this local institution, which sits just a block off the main drag of Avenida de la Constitución. Large earthenware wine jugs line the walls, some acting as chalkboards for the menu of daily specials, like arroz con higado (rice with liver) or chicken with mushrooms cooked in amontillado sherry. The anchovies on toast are the perfect accompaniment to a glass of house vermouth.

Pescaito frito (fried fish) is a staple in the Sevillano diet. You’ll find it in some form on most menus around the city, but this fry shop in Santa Cruz has been doing it best since 1929. Order a mixed quarter kilo (about half a pound) of seafood, and pick from a variety of fresh squid, shrimp, fish, huevas (roe), and distinctly Sevillano boquerones en adobo (anchovies marinated in vinegar). Pair the assortment with a local beer like Cruzcampo, then find a table or meander over to the Jardines de Murillo for a quiet picnic.

A restaurant exterior with intricate decoration.
Freiduría Puerta de la Carne in Seville.
Megan Lloyd

Visitors to Seville should carve out some time to browse the city’s food markets, including Triana’s. Tucked under the ancient Castillo de San Jorge, the market is bursting with sea creatures, local produce, and all things cured. Snag some fresh tomatoes, payoyo cheese, Iberian ham, and garlicky olives from one of the many vendors, and have yourself a riverside picnic.

Two customers stand in front of a deep red charcuterie stall.
Charcuterie stall at the Mercado de Triana.
Megan Lloyd

Take a break from the city center for a romantic trip across the Puente de Isabel II bridge, over the Guadalquivir river, and into Triana, a neighborhood with a totally distinct feel from the rest of Seville. There you’ll find Blanca Paloma, a staple of the residential area that serves traditional, exceptionally crafted tapas to crowds of faithful Trianeros. The restaurant’s coquinas (clams cooked in white wine and garlic) and bocaditos mejillones (mussels stuffed with bechamel and fried in breadcrumbs) are well worth the inevitable wait. You can sit upstairs, but it’s best to linger downstairs and dine tapas-style for better variety and prices.

A sign for a restaurant above an awning.
Outside Blanca Paloma
Megan Lloyd

Situated between two of the city’s best-known monuments, Plaza de España and the Alcázar, Ispal is a sumptuous celebration of Sevillano cuisine. The restaurant’s generous 10- to 15-course tasting menus are delightful, leisurely alternatives to the constant churn of the crowd at the city’s stand-up tapas bars. The kitchen artfully updates Seville’s most treasured dishes while respecting regional ingredients and traditions. For evidence, look no further than their take on gambas al ajillo (garlic shrimp), which is a knockout.

After stints at some of the best Michelin-starred restaurants in the country, chef Camila Ferraro and sommelier Robert Tetas opened up their now award-winning restaurant in a 1920s-style building originally constructed for the Ibero-American Exposition. Let Tetas guide you through the alluring wine list, which focuses primarily on Andalusian varieties and unique sherries, a far cry from your grandmother’s syrupy aperitivo. Then dive into Ferraro’s seasonal tasting menu; her devotion to seasonality and respect for local ingredients continues to bring her national accolades.

A covered patio decked in white with lots of dark green plants for accents.
The patio at Sobretablas Restaurante.
Sobretablas Restaurante

Link copied to the clipboard.

From above, a decorative plate with slices of squid on top of vegetables and pesto.
Squid with portobello carpaccio and pesto.
La Cochera del Abuelo

In an 18th-century carriage house, the folks at La Cochera del Abuelo have created an intimate dining experience that feels equally elegant and homey. Owner Cinta Romero’s experience is evident in the thorough service from her front-of-house team, along with the succinct list of especially engaging wines. The menu here changes regularly, but chef Bosco Benítez has a particular affinity for vegetables and the grill, which imparts whispers of smoke to even the lightest of dishes. The one-bite appetizers are some of the most memorable items, like a shell-on carpaccio-style scallop with smoky eggplant.

From above, a decorative plate with slices of squid on top of vegetables and pesto.
Squid with portobello carpaccio and pesto.
La Cochera del Abuelo

Unless you befriend a local, this is as close as you’ll come to eating in a Spanish home. Owner Ramón López initially opened his shop as an abacería (a wine store offering packaged foods and a few quick bites), but he and his family have since expanded to serve a full menu of breakfast, lunch, and dinner. The restaurant’s cozy ambience and the family’s dedication to quality sourcing have made Antigua Abacería an icon in the San Lorenzo neighborhood. Order a montadito de chorizo picante y cabrales (a sandwich with spicy chorizo and Asturian blue cheese) with a glass of sherry, and take your meal outside onto the quiet patio. Or step inside the cozy corner restaurant for “Lo que diga Ramón” and let López choose your meal for you.

An egg yolk sits on a gravy covered cake.
Egg yolk over truffle mushroom cake at Eslava.
Eslava

Hidden behind the Basílica de Jesús del Gran Poder, Eslava serves elevated Andalusian tapas and seems to be perpetually full of tourists and locals. The restaurant has rightfully won awards for many of its offerings, including the huevo sobre bizcocho de boletus y trufa (egg yolk over a truffle mushroom cake), but the honey rosemary pork ribs also deserve your utmost attention.

An egg yolk sits on a gravy covered cake.
Egg yolk over truffle mushroom cake at Eslava.
Eslava

Esteban Mujica has lived many lives. Born in Venezuela and raised in the United States, he embarked on careers in cycling, journalism, and wine. Most recently he resurrected his grandfather’s six vermouth recipes and built a bar where he could serve them alongside family stories. Mujica makes each vermouth from scratch, utilizing the region’s sherry wines and up to 54 different herbs. Trust him with your culinary preferences and he’ll pour you a refreshing vermouth or rare local wine to your taste, then carefully whip up a tapa to make your palate sing. Some of his finest dishes include trifásico de ahumados (a trio of mystery smoked fish Mujica likes to challenge diners to identify) and marinated sardines with manchego butter and mango pearls.

The interior of a wine shop with bottles lining simple wood shelves, with diners visible at tables outside beyond the front door.
Shopping at Lama La Uva.
Lama La Uva

Spanish wines are regularly overlooked for popular Riojas and albariños, even down south. But owner Ana Linares Martínez is breaking the mold of many Sevillano wine shops at Lama La Uva by sourcing interesting bottles from small producers, with a particular affinity for Andalusia. This is where you can get your natural wines and funky ancestrals. If you’re lucky, you’ll still find a few trace bottles of Lama La Uva’s own blends, which Linares describes with great affinity as “extremely nerdy.” Tastings are available, but you can also pick a bottle straight off the shelf and pair it immediately with the shop’s robust charcuterie board, which is always on point, before moving onto the recently debuted tapas menu.

The interior of a wine shop with bottles lining simple wood shelves, with diners visible at tables outside beyond the front door.
Shopping at Lama La Uva.
Lama La Uva

A proprietor stands in the doorway of a coffee shop.
Virgin Coffee in Seville.
Cristina Jiménez Sánchez

Pedro Sierra opened Seville’s first micro-roaster in 2015 in the shadow of the Setas, setting up his coffee roaster in the back of his to-go-only craft coffee shop. He eventually moved the roaster off-site, but his workspace doesn’t look any less cramped, and visiting isn’t always easy. There are just a few stools outside for seating, and Sierra only opens the shop six to seven hours each day (so he can drop off and pick up his kids from school). But it’s worth the hassle to try the coffee maestro’s next-to-perfect flat whites.

A proprietor stands in the doorway of a coffee shop.
Virgin Coffee in Seville.
Cristina Jiménez Sánchez

A server passes a plate of spinach across a bar.
Spinach with chickpeas at El Rinconcillo
El Rinconcillo

Known as the oldest tapas bar in Seville, El Rinconcillo opened its doors in 1670 just two blocks southeast of the Palacio de las Dueñas. The decor is quintessentially Sevillano: colorful Arabic tiles, dark wooden barrels, and a curtain of cured Iberian hams hanging over the bar. Though the crowds of tourists and locals may persuade you to ask for a quiet table upstairs, it’s best to embrace the chaos and huddle around the bar area to eat standing up in the traditional tapas style. Order the espinacas con garbanzos (braised spinach and garbanzos), and watch the servers tally your order directly on the mahogany bar, which acts as a chalkboard.

A server passes a plate of spinach across a bar.
Spinach with chickpeas at El Rinconcillo
El Rinconcillo

A hand holds two ice cream cones, one a bright yellow, the other a rich chocolate.
Ice cream is always in season.
Créeme

Seville’s sweltering summer seems to defy set calendar dates, making ice cream the surefire dessert of choice for a good stretch of the year. And no one does it better than the local ice cream wizard who runs Créeme and goes by the mononym Chami. His artisan shop, shaded under the impressive ficus varietals in the Plaza del Museo, serves hyperseasonal scoops that change constantly. Each flavor, whether it’s a classic pistachio or brilliant orange flecked with dark chocolate, is made with meticulously sourced ingredients, and all are poetically inspired by an event, person, or idea in the ice cream maker’s past and present. The solid selection of dairy-free options are just as worthy of praise.

A hand holds two ice cream cones, one a bright yellow, the other a rich chocolate.
Ice cream is always in season.
Créeme

This modest cafe, just a short walk from the Plaza del Duque, opens for morning churros from 7:30 a.m. until noon, then shuts down for the afternoon. When the owners turn the fryer on again at 5 p.m., crowds flood in, bartenders rapidly throw down steaming cups of hot coffee and thick hot chocolate, and servers fly out of the kitchen with fresh churros (to the amusement of anyone watching from the bar). The restaurant offers two styles: traditional airy churros and denser corrugated ones made with pureed potato. Try them both and decide for yourself which is better.

From above, a dish of fish in tomato sauce.
Fried Hake with Tomato Salad at Castizo.
Castizo

Sevillanos often use the word castizo to describe a traditional tapas bar, and this place lives up to the name, serving typical regional dishes with high-quality ingredients. The contemporary open kitchen makes for a lively atmosphere, especially given chef Francisco Balongo’s penchant for singing flamenco. You can’t go wrong with the well-rounded list of wines and superb Sevillano dishes like atún encebollado (stewed tuna) and shrimp croquettes. Be sure to ask your server about the ultra-fresh, daily offerings hiding at the seafood bar.

From above, a dish of fish in tomato sauce.
Fried Hake with Tomato Salad at Castizo.
Castizo

A thin meaty sandwich on a plate resting on a bartop.
Montadito de Pringá.
Jenna Swan

Antonio Romero has a few locations around town, but the spot on Harinas street in the Arenal neighborhood boasts the restaurant’s best Andalusian fare and Sevillano vibe. The place is known for its classic montadito de pringá (a toasted roll filled with all kinds of braised pork), but don’t miss the artichokes with cured Iberian ham or the carrillada (wine-braised pork cheeks).

A thin meaty sandwich on a plate resting on a bartop.
Montadito de Pringá.
Jenna Swan

Since 1850, many generations of the Morales family have worked at this local institution, which sits just a block off the main drag of Avenida de la Constitución. Large earthenware wine jugs line the walls, some acting as chalkboards for the menu of daily specials, like arroz con higado (rice with liver) or chicken with mushrooms cooked in amontillado sherry. The anchovies on toast are the perfect accompaniment to a glass of house vermouth.

A restaurant exterior with intricate decoration.
Freiduría Puerta de la Carne in Seville.
Megan Lloyd

Pescaito frito (fried fish) is a staple in the Sevillano diet. You’ll find it in some form on most menus around the city, but this fry shop in Santa Cruz has been doing it best since 1929. Order a mixed quarter kilo (about half a pound) of seafood, and pick from a variety of fresh squid, shrimp, fish, huevas (roe), and distinctly Sevillano boquerones en adobo (anchovies marinated in vinegar). Pair the assortment with a local beer like Cruzcampo, then find a table or meander over to the Jardines de Murillo for a quiet picnic.

A restaurant exterior with intricate decoration.
Freiduría Puerta de la Carne in Seville.
Megan Lloyd

Two customers stand in front of a deep red charcuterie stall.
Charcuterie stall at the Mercado de Triana.
Megan Lloyd

Visitors to Seville should carve out some time to browse the city’s food markets, including Triana’s. Tucked under the ancient Castillo de San Jorge, the market is bursting with sea creatures, local produce, and all things cured. Snag some fresh tomatoes, payoyo cheese, Iberian ham, and garlicky olives from one of the many vendors, and have yourself a riverside picnic.

Two customers stand in front of a deep red charcuterie stall.
Charcuterie stall at the Mercado de Triana.
Megan Lloyd

A sign for a restaurant above an awning.
Outside Blanca Paloma
Megan Lloyd

Take a break from the city center for a romantic trip across the Puente de Isabel II bridge, over the Guadalquivir river, and into Triana, a neighborhood with a totally distinct feel from the rest of Seville. There you’ll find Blanca Paloma, a staple of the residential area that serves traditional, exceptionally crafted tapas to crowds of faithful Trianeros. The restaurant’s coquinas (clams cooked in white wine and garlic) and bocaditos mejillones (mussels stuffed with bechamel and fried in breadcrumbs) are well worth the inevitable wait. You can sit upstairs, but it’s best to linger downstairs and dine tapas-style for better variety and prices.

A sign for a restaurant above an awning.
Outside Blanca Paloma
Megan Lloyd

Situated between two of the city’s best-known monuments, Plaza de España and the Alcázar, Ispal is a sumptuous celebration of Sevillano cuisine. The restaurant’s generous 10- to 15-course tasting menus are delightful, leisurely alternatives to the constant churn of the crowd at the city’s stand-up tapas bars. The kitchen artfully updates Seville’s most treasured dishes while respecting regional ingredients and traditions. For evidence, look no further than their take on gambas al ajillo (garlic shrimp), which is a knockout.

A covered patio decked in white with lots of dark green plants for accents.
The patio at Sobretablas Restaurante.
Sobretablas Restaurante

After stints at some of the best Michelin-starred restaurants in the country, chef Camila Ferraro and sommelier Robert Tetas opened up their now award-winning restaurant in a 1920s-style building originally constructed for the Ibero-American Exposition. Let Tetas guide you through the alluring wine list, which focuses primarily on Andalusian varieties and unique sherries, a far cry from your grandmother’s syrupy aperitivo. Then dive into Ferraro’s seasonal tasting menu; her devotion to seasonality and respect for local ingredients continues to bring her national accolades.

A covered patio decked in white with lots of dark green plants for accents.
The patio at Sobretablas Restaurante.
Sobretablas Restaurante

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